en-USit-IT
Language
Search
Search ×

Luca Mandalino

The Theory of push lines.

The four unescapable push lines and the five fundamental principles of modern tennis playing technique.

Chapter six.

Principle number four: “The main point of greater pressure of the hand on the grip, useful for forehand, service, smash strokes and the secondary point, used for backhand strokes, wield their force on a push line passing through the barycentre axis of the racket.”

Holding the racket correctly is fundamental to execute effective shots which would impress a dynamic spin to the ball by exerting the minimum effort required.
With the game stopped, we hold the racket and we press our fingers against the palm of the hand in a sufficiently even grip.
When playing a stroke by moving the racket quickly in the air,  some parts of the hand exert a greater pressure on the grip and when we hit the ball we can clearly feel the point of greater pressure.

There are two points in the hand where pressure and push are greater.

The “main” point of greater pressure is needed for all forehand, serve and smash strokes, the “secondary” point is used in one-handed backhand strokes.
When playing a two-handed backhand, the second hand utilizes the “main” point of greater pressure.
Each of the two points is associated to the correct positioning of the hypothenar  (a fleshy lump placed at the base of the little finger in the palm of the hand) on the butt of the handle.

(figure showing the main point of greater pressure of the hand and of the hypothenar)

(figure showing the secondary point of greater pressure of the hand and of the hypothenar)

(figure showing the barycentre axis of the racket)

The point of greater pressure of the hand on the handle exerts its force on a push line passing through the barycentre axis of the racket; the hand moves along the same push line until it finds the exact point of impact with the ball.
This push line may vary its angle compared to the barycentre axis of the racket by several degrees, with the string face placed vertically as a reference point; this depends on the exact position of the point of greater pressure of the hand and of the hypothenar on the handle  and makes it easy to hit the ball at the possible different heights.
The angle of this push line is the first of the two essential factors of the grip which determine the dynamic mechanism of the racket which, in its turn, causes the dynamic spin transferred to the ball.
The other one is the double function carried out by the adherence of the hypothenar to the butt of the handle described in the next chapter, concerning principle number five.

(11 figures , all concerning the grip with the three different entrance angles in the area of maximum force and maximum sensitivity, 3 on the serve, 3 on the forehand, 3 on the backhand, only 2 on the two-handed backhand because I suggest using only one hand to execute a backspin)

The way to grip the racket and the player’s synergic action are therefore interdependent.

Previous Article Chapter five.
Next Article Chapter seven.
2033 Rate this article:
5.0
Copyright by TennisAsset.com - All right reserved. Terms Of Use Privacy Statement
Back To Top